Accomplishments

2013

Policy reducing the health burden associated with tobacco

Created and adopted a faculty-approved policy aimed at reducing tobacco’s public health burden.

Impact

This policy not only opposes tobacco sales in pharmacies and stores with pharmacies, but also endorses evidence-based strategies, regulations, and legislation that help to prevent smoking initiation among youth, increase the likelihood of quitting among current smokers, and reduce exposure to second-hand smoke. UCSF was one of two schools of pharmacy in the nation to adopt such a policy.

Principal faculty

  • B. Joseph Guglielmo, PharmD
  • Robin Corelli, PharmD
  • Lisa Kroon, PharmD
  • Karen Hudmon, DrPH, RPh (volunteer faculty)

2012

Partners in E

Developed and implemented an innovative modular online course to provide instruction in numerous informatics topics, including electronic health records and electronic prescribing.

Impact

Faculty and staff members from the department developed the Introduction to Pharmacy Informatics course, which offers 12 distinct online modules to address a recent requirement by the ACPE Council. Using the train-the-trainer model, Partners in E was implemented in all eight accredited California schools of pharmacy. By 2013, a total of 948 California pharmacy students were trained using the Partners in E curriculum. As a result of its success, UCSF’s Partners in E teamed up with the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, the California Healthcare Foundation, and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy to fill the widely recognized nationwide gap in informatics curricula.

Principal faculty

  • Elisa Ashton, PharmD
  • Timothy Cutler, PharmD
  • Bret Brodowy, PharmD
  • Sokkim Lim, PharmD
  • Marco Gonzales, PharmD
  • Amanda Fingado, MPH
  • Genevieve Stevens (program manager)

2011

Individualized dosing for medications in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients

Established an inpatient pharmacy service for advanced clinical pharmacology consults and therapeutic drug monitoring for pediatric bone marrow transplant patients. Medications such as busulfan, fludarabine, and mycophenolate currently lack standard dosing guidelines in the pediatric population. Through novel clinical pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics clinical research, Dr. Long-Boyle is able to develop dosing strategies for small children.

Impact

Improving the efficacy and reducing toxicity in drug therapy in pediatric populations through the application of personalized dosing strategies.

Principal faculty

  • Janel Long-Boyle, PharmD, PhD

2008

UCSF Center for Translational and Policy Research on Personalized Medicine (TRANSPERS)

Established one of the first centers in the United States to examine the translation of personalized medicine—the use of genetics to target health care—and how it can improve quality of care and reduce health care costs.

Impact

The TRANSPERS Center has influenced health policy in personalized medicine and its translation into clinical care around the world through publications in major journals such as JAMA.

Principal faculty

  • Kathryn A. Phillips, PhD founder and director of the TRANSPERS Center

Ban on San Francisco pharmacies selling cigarettes

Promoted a ban on the sale of cigarettes in pharmacies in San Francisco.

Impact

San Francisco was one of the first cities in the United States to prohibit the sale of cigarettes in pharmacies. The ban not only promotes better health, it also highlights the role of pharmacies and pharmacists in promoting health, not enabling disease. This effort helped lead to the announcement by CVS Corporation in 2014 that they would stop selling tobacco in all their pharmacies.

Principal faculty

  • Lisa Bero, PhD
  • Robin Corelli, PharmD
  • Mary Ann Koda-Kimble, PharmD
  • Lisa Kroon, PharmD

2007

Medication Outcomes Center

Formed the Medication Outcomes Center (MOC) to help assess the value of medication-related health care interventions. The MOC ensures and documents that medications are used safely and appropriately in all clinical settings at the UCSF Medical Center, supported by evidence-based and value-based methodology.

Impact

Among the many activities of the MOC, the Center performs cost-effectiveness analyses, supports the UCSF Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, supports medication safety initiatives, and performs drug-use evaluations. The Center is also leading the collaboration with other UC hospitals in formulary and medication management.

Principal faculty

  • B. Joseph Guglielmo, PharmD
  • Candy Tsourounis, PharmD
  • Bret Brodowy, PharmD
  • Sheri VanOsdol, PharmD

2006

Partners in D Project

Created an innovative statewide peer-to-peer model to assist Medicare-eligible patients with enrollment in the Medicare drug plan (Part D) that best meets their needs.

Impact

Partners in D—a collaboration among seven pharmacy schools in California—assisted Medicare beneficiaries in navigating the complex Part D program by utilizing the expertise of Doctor of Pharmacy students. A total of 3,680 student pharmacists were trained and deployed as a new workforce of highly skilled patient advocates, which ultimately increased appropriate medication access among underserved Medicare patients. The project expanded beyond California, reaching people in Massachusetts, New York, Chicago, and Washington State.

Principal faculty

  • Marilyn Stebbins, PharmD
  • Helene Levens Lipton, PhD
  • Timothy Cutler, PharmD

2001

Pharmacist Review to Increase Cost-Effectiveness (PRICE) Clinic

Developed an effective clinic model to assist patients in reviewing their medication lists, working with primary health care providers to ensure patients are able to afford and can continue taking their medicines.

Impact

In 2001, when the largest Medicare Advantage plan (Medicare Part C) eliminated brand name drug coverage, the UCSF School of Pharmacy's Department of Clinical Pharmacy collaborated with Mercy Medical Group to create the Pharmacist Review to Increase Cost-Effectiveness (PRICE) Clinic as a way to ensure that patients could obtain the prescription drugs they needed—at an average savings of $1,500 per year—with the help of pharmacists, pharmacy students, and residents. Since that time, numerous other California pharmacy schools have adopted the PRICE clinic model.

Principal faculty

  • Marilyn Stebbins, PharmD
  • Timothy Cutler, PharmD

2000

Conflict of interest and research integrity

Determined that industry-sponsored research conclusions are frequently biased in favor of the sponsor.

Impact

Research led by Lisa Bero, PhD, found university policies regarding conflict of interest and growing industry sponsorship of university research are frequently imprecise, inconsistent, and inadequate to prevent bias in research. Due in part to the research conducted in the UCSF School of Pharmacy Department of Clinical Pharmacy, The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently prohibited NIH researchers from accepting consulting fees or other personal income from private industry, in an attempt to limit bias in research findings.

Principal faculty

  • Lisa Ann Bero, PhD
  • Elizabeth Boyd, PhD

Target dose adjustment of busulfan in pediatric patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation

Ann Bolinger and colleagues adjusted the busulfan dose to each individualized child’s needs using pharmacokinetic parameters to improve engraftment without increasing toxicity.

Impact

Children undergoing bone marrow transplants for leukemia or genetic disorders previously received the same standard dosage per body weight as adults of the drug busulfan. Adoption of the new method increased the likelihood that an expensive and intensive bone marrow transplant treatment for deadly blood diseases will be successful and lifesaving in children.

Principal faculty

  • Ann Bolinger, PharmD
  • Abby Zangwill, PharmD
  • Morton Cowan, MD

1999

Tobacco cessation curriculum: Rx for Change, clinician-assisted tobacco cessation

Designed and implemented a comprehensive, evidence-based tobacco cessation training program, intended to be integrated into the required pharmacy school curricula. This is an open-source curriculum for all health care students and professionals, available on the UCSF website at Rx for Change.

Impact

Rx for Change has been used to train more than 150,000 health professional students and licensed clinicians throughout the United States and abroad, and has been translated into multiple languages including Spanish and Chinese. The Rx for Change website has more than 8,900 registered users from 46 countries and all 50 U.S. states.

Principal faculty

  • Robin Corelli, PharmD
  • Karen Hudmon, DrPH, RPh (volunteer faculty)
  • Lisa Kroon, PharmD

1997

California Poison Control System (CPCS)

Consolidated California’s six independent poison control centers into one integrated system, which is administered by the UCSF School of Pharmacy and responds to inquiries 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, via a toll-free telephone number.

Impact

The California Poison Control System (CPCS) responds to approximately 900,000 poisoning inquiries each year and saves California $70 million annually in medical treatment costs.

Principal faculty

Principal faculty responsible for the consolidation of the CPCS:

  • Stuart Heard, PharmD, executive director, CPCS

1980s (late)

Antimicrobial Stewardship Program

Pioneered one of the first hospital antimicrobial stewardship programs in the United States—the UCSF Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at UCSF Medical Center.

Impact

The UCSF Antimicrobial Stewardship Program evolved from studies led by B. Joseph Guglielmo, PharmD. Results showed that hospital-based antimicrobial prescription-monitoring programs managed by clinical pharmacists and physicians specializing in infectious diseases had the potential to reduce significant adverse antimicrobial events in hospitalized patients. Guglielmo’s work predated, by two decades, the antimicrobial stewardship practice guidelines first recommended by the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) in 2007. UCSF PharmD residents who train in the program serve in leadership positions in pharmacy infectious diseases and antimicrobial stewardship throughout the United States.

Principal faculty

  • B. Joseph Guglielmo, PharmD, served as director of the Antimicrobial Management Program at UCSF and led initial research and creation/implementation of the UCSF Antimicrobial Stewardship Residency Program.

1978

Leading clinical pharmacy text

Created the first textbook to use a case-based approach to assist students in mastering the fundamentals of drug therapeutics, which helped revolutionize pharmacy’s role in the health care arena.

Impact

The publication of Applied Therapeutics: The Clinical Use of Drugs changed the pharmacy profession’s focus from one of “just the facts” to how facts can be used to identify and solve real clinical problems. The thinking in Applied Therapeutics helped drive forward the pharmacy profession by educating pharmacists as drug therapy experts and making them an integral part of today’s professional health care team. Now in its 10th edition, Applied Therapeutics is used in pharmacy schools throughout the world.

Principal faculty

Principal faculty instrumental in developing the original textbook:

  • Mary Anne Koda-Kimble, PharmD
  • Lloyd Young, PharmD
  • Brian Katcher, PharmD

1975

Expanded role of clinical pharmacists through legislation: AB 717

Endorsed and promoted the California Legislature’s approval of AB 717, a pilot project for the expanded role of pharmacists and other health professionals, which paved the way for SB 493 in 2013.

Impact

The expansion of the role of pharmacists enabled the department to train professionals who could assume more responsibility for the medication outcomes of patients. One of the first programs developed at UCSF as a result of AB 717 was the Anticoagulation Clinic, led by Steven Kayser. Both UCSF Clinical Pharmacy’s cutting edge pharmacy practice models and the department’s collaboration with the California legislature culminated in the passage of SB 493 in 2013, which grants limited prescribing authority to pharmacists in California, including provision for the Advanced Practice Pharmacist (APP) recognition.

Principal faculty

  • B. Joseph Guglielmo, PharmD

1972

Satellite teaching programs

Established satellite programs throughout California to provide additional opportunities for fourth-year clerkships for UCSF student pharmacists, while allowing UCSF to expand its reach and influence—and the concepts of clinical pharmacy practice—across the state.

Impact

Establishing UCSF satellite programs for pharmacy education in Los Angeles-Orange County, North Bay, Santa Clara-South Bay, UC Davis-Sacramento, and UCSF at Fresno played a major role in expanding clinical pharmacy services throughout California.

Principal faculty

Principal faculty involved in the original collaborative effort:

  • Theodore Tong, PharmD
  • Ronald Conte, PharmD
  • David Adler, PharmD
  • Sam Shimomura, PharmD
  • Barbara Sauer, PharmD
  • Peter Ambrose, PharmD
  • Mitra Assemi, PharmD
  • Katherine Yang, PharmD, MPH
  • Glenn Yokoyama, PharmD
  • Kirsten Balano, PharmD

1970

First clinical pharmacy competency statements

Created the first competency statements for UCSF students taking clinical pharmacy clerkships.

Impact

UCSF’s clinical pharmacy competency statements later became the California State Board of Pharmacy Professional Competency in Pharmacy statement which, one year later, was adopted by all three existing California schools of pharmacy.

Principal faculty

  • Robert Day, PharmD
  • Sidney Riegelman, PhD

1966

Drug Information Analysis Service (DIAS)

Expanded the breadth of drug information provided to other health care professionals, including analyses of drug relevance to specific patients and illnesses.

Impact

In 1966, for the first time, pharmacists working in the Drug Information Analysis Service (DIAS) provided analyses of current drugs that were available for specific diseases and made recommendations about proposed drugs to ensure patients received the best and most effective medication with the fewest possible side effects. DIAS pharmacists also provided in-depth answers to complex drug information questions from UCSF providers. With the advent of online drug information databases in the 21st century, the DIAS service closed in 2007 and morphed into the Medication Outcomes Center.

Principal faculty

  • Joseph Hirschman, PharmD
  • Donna Schroeder, PharmD
  • Candy Tsourounis, PharmD

1965

Residency training programs

Developed and implemented one of the first pharmacy residency programs in the country, which served as a model for numerous pharmacy schools throughout the United States.

Impact

The pharmacy residency program, a collaboration of UCSF School of Pharmacy and UCSF Medical Center, has trained more than 600 residents since its inception in 1965. Areas of specialized residency training continue to grow—with new programs emerging, expansion of existing programs, and ongoing areas of specialization. Because our graduates practice across the nation, their impact on patient care, professional pharmacy leadership, and future training of pharmacists is far reaching.

Principal faculty

  • Eric Owyang, RPh
  • Eric T. Herfindal, PharmD, MPH
  • Brian Alldredge, PharmD
  • Donald Kishi, PharmD
  • Cathi Dennehy, PharmD (current PGY1 pharmacy practice residency director)